TIXIS.

December 2020

Tixi's music is a whole journey to the real roots of humanity and nature through electronic beats. Tixi's music is honest, pure and his own particular language to express himself. We talk with him about the need of reconnecting with nature, his new La Guajira EP and converting an image memory into a song. 

"I think it is very necessary to reconnect again with nature and to learn to live a little more in accordance with it".

This is your first personal music project. How does TIXIS originate?

 

Tixis arises from the need to find a musical space that allows me to explore what I really want to express. It is a space that tries to be as transparent and sincere as possible where I seek to understand myself more both personally and musically. However, I do not consider Tixis as a closed individual project but as an open space to share and grow with other artists.

Your EP debut is called La Guajira, which is a region in Colombia, and the Wayuu, an indigenous ethnic group from that very region, is referenced in your songs. What is the Wayuu to you? Why does it have such presence and importance in your project? In what way did they inspire you?  

 

 

For me, the Wayuu are the whole group of people that I came across along the way and with whom I was able to share very special moments. They opened the doors of their house, we exchanged conversations and brought me closer to their traditional music that I later tried to translate into songs. I think what inspired me the most was their strong connection with nature and it is for this reason that the Wayuu are so important in my project. I think it is very necessary to reconnect again with nature and to learn to live a little more in accordance with it. 

"I composed Oütsü trying to capture an image stuck in my mind when I met an older Oütsü woman in La Guajira".

Which are some of your musical references? 

 

I think my main musical reference and with which I discovered electronic music was with the album Migration by Bonobo. However, one of the albums that has influenced me the most has been Shvat by Tatran.

 

"The Cerrejón coal mining is leaving the area without water and that is why this element is so important in the La Guajira EP".

You released your new song Oütsü (feat. Tarta Relena) this last friday. This is a song about the healer women from the Wayuu tribe, who guide rituals with water, voices and dreams. How does working with Tarta Relena relate to this particular song?

I composed Oütsü trying to capture an image that stuck in my mind when I met an older Oütsü woman in La Guajira. With the song, I wanted to convey a message that would bring the listener closer to his more spiritual side, and I quickly thought that Tarta Relena were ideal to transmit this message. I thought that their project fit very well with the idea behind the song and the result exceeded all my expectations. The truth is that the recording moment was a very beautiful reunion after so many months without seeing each other due to travel and confinement.

 

Water is a recurrent topic in La Guajira EP. Is it your favourite element? What does it mean to you?

 

I think it is not what does it mean to me but what does it mean for the Wayuu. La Guajira is a territory that has a tendency to desertification and water is an essential element both for crops and for their rituals. The Cerrejón coal mining is leaving the area without water and that is why this element is so important in the La Guajira EP.

 

"I think Streaming has been good for valuing live music and seeing how important the connection is between the artist and the listener on stage".

Cris Dacoba has directed two of your music videos so far: Oütsü and All Water (feat. The Bird Yellow). The stylistic similarity is evident. How did this collaboration begin?

 

The truth is that the videos basically arise thanks to Cris's strong involvement in the project. I told her about the idea of making a simple videoclip, but she quickly began to pitch me proposals, look for locations where she could record shots and invite more artists to collaborate on all this. For me it has been a super nice experience and we have created a very united team that has worked perfectly. I think the stylistic of the videos comes from the work that Cris Dacoba, Aina Maria Cantallops and Aina Canyelles did along with the rest of the team. The feedback between us has been constant and everyone has collaborated when making decisions. 

 

Has the pandemic affected or influenced your music project in any way? 

 

The pandemic helped me to materialize everything I had experienced so far in the form of an EP. I entered into a constant dynamic of composing and listening to a lot of music during that period that surely influenced my project. In fact, the collaboration with The Bird Yellow was made remotely when we were confined. I think that creating the EP helped me live the pandemic much better. 

 

"I prefer to take it all easy".

Streaming, yes or no (and why)? 

 

I think Streaming has been good for valuing live music and seeing how important the connection is between the artist and the listener on stage. As an alternative to the current situation I don't think it's bad but I wouldn't consider myself a big fan. Also, I think it encourages being glued to the screen even more.

 

What are some of your rituals in the morning? Cereals or milk first?

Haha first a glass of water, of course, and then some bread.

 

What is the last song you’ve discovered that has rocked your world?

Farr by Christian Löffler

 

Where is the future of TIXIS headed?

I have no idea. I'm starting to prepare for live performances but with the current situation I'm not in a great hurry. For now, I am still focused on  composing more songs. I prefer to take it all easy.

 

And last, but not least. TIXIS in one word:

Tranquility.